Tag Archives: France

Execution of the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar

On the 18th March 1314 Jacques de Molay, the last Grand Master of the Knights Templar, was executed on the orders of King Philip IV. Although he had first been arrested in 1307, and the Order was formally abolished by Pope Clement V three years later, Molay’s execution secured his place as one of the most famous members of the Knights Templar.

Hundred Years' War

The first naval battle with artillery was the first naval engagement of the Hundred Years’ War

The first recorded naval battle featuring artillery took place on 23rd September 1338 in the first naval engagement of the Hundred Years’ War.

How did the longbow help Edward III win the Battle of Crécy in the Hundred Years War?

On the 26th August 1346, one of the most decisive battles in the Hundred Years War was won by the army of the English king Edward III. The Battle of Crécy was fought against the French army of King Philip VI and eventually led to the port of Calais becoming an English enclave for over two centuries.

The Battle of Agincourt in the Hundred Years War – a summary

On the 25th October 1415, the English king Henry V celebrated a major victory in the Hundred Years War when he defeated the numerically superior French army at the Battle of Agincourt. Famous for its use of English and Welsh longbowmen, the battle is also falsely claimed to provide the origin for the so-called ‘two finger salute’, the V sign that is used as an offensive gesture in England.

Battle of the Herrings fought between France and England in the Hundred Years’ War

On the 12th February 1429, the curiously-named Battle of the Herrings was fought between French and English forces near the village of Rouvray in France. One of numerous clashes during the Hundred Years’ War, it ended in English victory. However, Joan of Arc’s prediction of the French defeat is said to have contributed greatly to her securing a visit to the French Dauphin Charles VII.

Perkin Warbeck and his claim to be King Richard IV

On the 7th September the Second Cornish Uprising of 1497 began when Perkin Warbeck landed at Whitesand Bay near Land’s End. The significance of Warbeck is that he soon declared himself King Richard IV as he had convinced his followers that he was Richard, Duke of York, the younger of the two “Princes in the Tower”.

Map of the trenches

Map showing extent of WW1 trench movement, Aug 1914-Nov 1918

This fabulous map comes from the Harvard University Map Collection.

Map of the trenches

Photo comparing daily diets of the ‘haves’ vs ‘have nots’ in France 1789

Photo comparing daily diets of the 'haves' vs 'have nots' in France 1789 from www.aircirculation.org

From www.aircirculation.org


3 estates cartoon

The Origins of the French Revolution

This revision podcast presents the background to the French Revolution.  Beginning with the impact of the Enlightenment on 18th Century Europe, it goes on to examine a variety of factors that led to the Revolution.  Long-term issues that are covered include the Estates System, the emergence of the bourgeoisie and the changing economy, taxation and financial problems, and the effect of the population increase.  Shorter term causes that are explained include the impact of King Louis XVI, the Assembly of the Notables, the Estates General, and the Tennis Court Oath.  Factors are explained thematically to make it easier to organise ideas during revision, and it’s hoped that this will in turn help you create a well-structured answer.



What was life like in pre-Revolutionary France?

First-hand accounts from 18th Century writer Arthur Young, who travelled through France in the years before the revolution.  Excellent overview of the inequality of life between the French peasantry compared to that of the nobility.  Extract from Curriculum Bites.