Tudors and Stuarts

The Battle of Bosworth: one of the last major battles of the Wars of the Roses

On the 22nd August 1485, King Richard III was killed at the Battle of Bosworth and the forces of Henry Tudor brought the Plantagenet dynasty to an end. Henry secured his reign soon afterwards by later marrying Elizabeth of York, the niece of Richard III and daughter of Edward IV, and united the two warring houses through the symbolism of the Tudor rose.

Defender of the Faith

Why was Henry VIII given the title ‘Defender of the Faith’ in 1521?

On the 11th October 1521, Pope Leo X granted the title “Defender of the Faith” to King Henry VIII of England. To be accurate he actually granted the Latin title ‘Fidei defensor’ but the message was the same: Henry was being rewarded for upholding the Catholic faith in the face of the developing Protestant Reformation and the ideas of Martin Luther.

Waltham Abbey

Waltham Abbey and the Dissolution of the Monasteries – a short overview

On the 23rd March 1540, Waltham Abbey in Essex became the last abbey to be dissolved by Henry VIII. Henry had visited the abbey a number of times and is known to have stayed there with Queen Anne Boleyn in 1532. However, despite surviving for a number of years Waltham Abbey eventually succumbed to the Dissolution of the Monasteries. This caused an economic disaster in the town, which had grown prosperous as a result of pilgrims visiting the abbey.

Anne Boleyn's execution

Why was Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII’s second wife, executed? A short overview.

On the 19th May 1536, Anne Boleyn – Henry VIII’s second wife and mother of the future Elizabeth I – was beheaded in the Tower of London, having been found guilty of adultery, treason, and incest.

Lady Jane Grey

Why was Lady Jane Grey queen of England for only nine days?

On the 10th July 1553, Lady Jane Grey was proclaimed queen of England after her first cousin once removed, the 15-year-old King Edward VI, died of an unknown respiratory problem. However, the Privy Council proclaimed Edward’s older sister Mary as queen just nine days later and imprisoned Jane in the Tower of London. She was tried on charges of high treason, found guilty, and beheaded the following February.

John Rogers execution

John Rogers and the Protestant persecutions under ‘Bloody’ Mary I of England

On the 4th February 1555, John Rogers became the first Protestant martyr under ‘Bloody’ Mary I of England.

Execution of Thomas Cranmer

Why was Thomas Cranmer executed in 1556?

On the 21st March 1556, Thomas Cranmer was executed for heresy. As a leader of the English Reformation he had not only promoted Protestantism but had also established the first structures of the Church of England. Despite having signed a number of recantations or retractions of his Protestant faith, on the day of his execution he in turn recanted these recantations before being burned at the stake.

‘The Beggars are Coming’ – classic BBC school history documentary

This isn’t great visual quality, but the content is excellent – it covers issues of poverty during the Tudor period very well. What is a parish? How was it organised as the center of local government during the Tudor period?

Elizabeth I

The start of Queen Elizabeth I’s reign

On the 17th November 1558, Elizabeth I succeeded her half-sister Mary to become queen of England. The last of the Tudor dynasty, Elizabeth’s reign is seen by many as a ‘golden age’ in English history. A period of relative political and religious stability, her reign saw unprecedented foreign exploration and expansion, while at home the English Renaissance brought about enormous cultural developments and the rise of one of the greatest playwrights ever to have lived – William Shakespeare.

Elizabeth I and the first English lottery

Elizabeth I and the first English lottery (where everybody won a prize!)

On the 11th January 1569, the first recorded lottery was drawn in England under Elizabeth I.