Tag Archives: Iran

Iranian Revolution 1979

Why was there a revolution in Iran in 1979?

This revision podcast is relevant to both GCSE and IGCSE History students, , although AS and IB students may find it a helpful introduction to events in the Gulf in the later 20th Century.  The aim is to present an explanation of the factors that led to the Iranian Revolution in 1979.

The podcast explores three key factors:

  • Dissatisfaction with Shah’s government and his handling of the economic and social problems in Iran
  • A widespread anti-Western attitude as a result of the Shah’s close relationship with Britain and the USA
  • The role and impact of Ayatollah Khomeini

The revision guide aims to give clear examples for each of these factors, and explain how they contributed to the revolution that transformed Iran into a theocracy.

     

Last Shah of Iran

The overthrow of the Shah in the Iranian Revolution, 1979

On the 11th February 1979 Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, the last Shah of Iran, was overthrown as a result of the Iranian Revolution. His overthrow saw the end of the 2,500 year old monarchy in Iran and ushered in a theocracy overseen by the Ayatollah Khomeini.

Under the Shah, Iran enjoyed immense wealth built on an abundant supply of oil, although the vast majority of the population continued to live in poverty. The Shah, who had come to power in 1941, tried to secure support by using oil money to modernize Iran. However these reforms, known as the ‘White Revolution’ were interpreted by some as pandering to Western ideals that went against Iran’s traditions.

Despite the establishment of the brutal SAVAK secret police, a growing number of Iranians were increasingly turning against the Shah. They found a leader in the Muslim scholar Ayatollah Khomeini who, despite being forced into exile in 1964, continued to be a vocal critic of the Shah’s government. He played down his intention to establish an Islamic government, focusing instead on his desire to overthrow the Shah.

On September 8th 1978, over 500 people were killed by soldiers on what became known as ‘Black Friday’. The Shah’s attempts to restore calm had no effect on the public, who continued to call for his removal.

Recognising that his overthrow was becoming inevitable, the Shah and his wife left Iran on January 15 for the USA. Khomeini returned to Iran two weeks later. Finally, on the 11th February the Supreme Military Council ordered all troops back to their barracks, effectively handing control to Khomeini and his supporters.

Iran-Iraq War

Causes and Consequences of the Iran-Iraq War, 1980-88

This revision podcast is relevant to both GCSE and IGCSE History students, although AS and IB students may find it a helpful introduction to events in the Gulf in the later 20th Century.

The podcast looks at three key factors:

  • The different causes of the war, including Iran’s threat to Saddam’s regime, the opportunity for Iraq to gain territory and oil, and timing
  • The nature of how the war was fought, including the impact of foreign powers
  • The consequences of the war for each nation

The revision guide aims to give clear examples for each of these factors, and explain how students might approach a question on them in the exam.