Tag Archives: conservatism

3 estates cartoon

The Origins of the French Revolution

This revision podcast presents the background to the French Revolution.  Beginning with the impact of the Enlightenment on 18th Century Europe, it goes on to examine a variety of factors that led to the Revolution.  Long-term issues that are covered include the Estates System, the emergence of the bourgeoisie and the changing economy, taxation and financial problems, and the effect of the population increase.  Shorter term causes that are explained include the impact of King Louis XVI, the Assembly of the Notables, the Estates General, and the Tennis Court Oath.  Factors are explained thematically to make it easier to organise ideas during revision, and it’s hoped that this will in turn help you create a well-structured answer.

          

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Tennis Court Oath

The Estates General, Tennis Court Oath and National Assembly

Pope Pius IX

The election Pope Pius IX: a brief overview (podcast episode)

Born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, Pius IX’s election by the Papal conclave of 1846 came at a time of significant political unrest across Europe. A particular issue facing the 50 members of the College of Cardinals who attended the conclave regarded the future governance of the Papal States, which the new Pope would rule. A conservative faction wished to see the continuation of a policy of papal absolutism, while more moderate cardinals hoped for some liberal reforms.

Going against the general mood of the rulers of Europe who wished to see a conservative Pope, the moderate Cardinal Bernetti successfully persuaded other like-minded cardinals to vote for Mastai-Ferretti. The papal historian Valérie Pirie wrote that, as one of the scrutineers responsible for recording the votes of the conclave, Mastai-Ferretti therefore proclaimed his own election.

His appointment was met with enthusiasm from European liberals, and he was celebrated by English Protestants as a ‘friend of light’. Having named himself Pius after Pope Pius VII, the first years of the new Pope’s rule saw a number of liberal actions including the release of political prisoners and the beginnings of a constitution for the Papal States. However, the revolutions of 1848-49 and a number of nationalist terrorist attacks began to turn him away from this initially liberal agenda.

By the 1850s Pius IX had become more conservative, and he began to consolidate the power of the Church. The capture of the Papal States by the Italian Army in 1870, however, led to him declaring himself the ‘Prisoner of the Vatican’.

Flag of the Roman Republic

The Italian Revolutions of 1848-49

This IB and A Level History revision podcast looks at the causes and events of the revolutions of 1848-49 in the Italian states. Beginning with the impact of Pope Pius IX’s liberal experiment of 1846-47, it explores the development of the revolutions that followed, and which swept across the Italian states. The rise and fall of the Roman Republic is explained, before going on to assess the reasons for the ultimate failure of the revolutions.

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Origins and effects of the Liberal Reforms

This revision podcast presents an overview of the Liberal Reforms in Britain.

The episode begins with an explanation of the situation before the reforms, and why they were introduced.  Reference is made to social research at the time, key politicians, the impact of the Boer War, Britain’s industrial situation, and the effect of voting reforms in the late 19th Century.

The podcast then goes on to explain what the reforms did to improve life for four key groups – children, old people, the unemployed, and workers.  Finally, advice and examples are given for writing a balanced answer on how successful (or unsuccessful) the Liberal Reforms were.

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The origins of German unification: 1815-1848

This revision podcast presents the background of German unification.  Beginning with the Congress of Vienna in 1815, the podcast goes on to explore the opposing conservative and progressive factors at play in the early 19th Century.  In terms of conservatism, we consider the impact of Metternich, the role of the nobles and the influence of the church.  The growth of progressive factors such as the impact of the railways and industrialisation, the middle class, and the Zollverein are also considered.

     

Historiography: The failure of the German revolutions 1848-49

This revision podcast presents the key factors that led to the failure of the revolutions in the German states.  This is done through a consideration of the historiography of period.  Particular focus is put on the work of Eric Eyck, Karl Marx, AJP Taylor and Bob Whitfield and the different interpretations they reached about the reasons for failure.  Historical evidence is then presented that could be used to support their opinions.

          

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